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Loise King Waller, PhD

Psychologist

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“The world breaks everyone, then some become strong

at the broken places.”

~Ernest Hemingway

 
 
     
Hemingway was on to something!

We can become stronger in the broken places.
 
This reminds me of the Japanese practice of kintsugi, in which fractured vessels are reconstructed by mending the broken pieces with gold or platinum.
 
This loving repair transforms the object into something far stronger and more precious.

Drawing strength from hardship is the essence of resilience

 

A Little About Me

 

 

 

I welcome individuals experiencing the effects of trauma and grief, and encourage skill building in those who face challenges. My approach is existential infused with a love of mindfulness, along with the selective incorporation of elements of both cognitive behavioral and dialectical behavior therapies.

 

My path to the practice of psychology has been unusual. Although I am a native Texan, I received my undergraduate degree from Boston University. Upon graduation, I enrolled at The University of Texas School of Law. I practiced employment law briefly before returning to school to study psychology (my law license is on “inactive” status). Upon the completion of coursework and practica, I was accepted to an APPIC accredited internship at Girard Medical Center in Philadelphia. There I worked with inpatients diagnosed with serious mental illnesses as well as outpatients struggling with complex trauma and loss. In November 2018, I graduated from APA accredited Fielding Graduate University with a doctorate in Clinical Psychology. I am now licensed as a clinical psychologist in the state of Texas (#38226).

I see patients through New Life Institute in Austin, Texas. New Life is a nonprofit counseling center located in the Clarksville neighborhood of central Austin. At present, I am conducting sessions online using a HIPAA compliant video therapy platform. I accept a number of insurance plans and my schedule is flexible to accommodate the schedules of working people and students.

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